Canyon Chronicle

NaNoWriMo helps students overcome challenges

Over 233,000 words written during novel-writing month

Seventh+graders+Jamiee+Ewing%2C+Reece+Tavares%2C+and+Marion+Blakely+write+in+a+comfortable+spot+in+as+they+write+a+novel.+Mrs.+Bartholomew%27s+advanced+language+arts+students+participated+in+the+NaNoWriMo+event+during+November.+
Seventh graders Jamiee Ewing, Reece Tavares, and Marion Blakely write in a comfortable spot in as they write a novel. Mrs. Bartholomew's advanced language arts students participated in the NaNoWriMo event during November.

Seventh graders Jamiee Ewing, Reece Tavares, and Marion Blakely write in a comfortable spot in as they write a novel. Mrs. Bartholomew's advanced language arts students participated in the NaNoWriMo event during November.

Mr. Davis

Mr. Davis

Seventh graders Jamiee Ewing, Reece Tavares, and Marion Blakely write in a comfortable spot in as they write a novel. Mrs. Bartholomew's advanced language arts students participated in the NaNoWriMo event during November.

Rylee Anforth, Chronicle Editor

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     Seventh graders participated in National Novel Writing Month during the month of November to help them improve as writers and learn how to push themselves to achieve a goal.
     National Novel Writing Month, or NaNoWriMo, is a challenge across the United States, where students attempt to write a book in one month. Students get badges within the program when they reach certain word count goals and for writing for a consecutive number of days. As a class language arts teacher Theresa Bartholomew and her students decided on the word count goal of 5,500 words.
     “Seventh grade students are expected to write routinely, to write narratives (stories) that have well-structured event sequences, use dialogue when telling a story, and use guidance from peers to strengthen their writing,” Bartholomew said.
     The students continued working on the assigned grade standards, but took about 30 minutes of class time to work on their stories. The students were expected to take the time out of their after school schedules to work on their stories as well.
     “Writing the novel to me was important because of what we were learning from it,” Kailey McWilliams said.
     By doing this project Bartholomew hopes students not only improved their writing strategies but also gained a new level of confidence by pushing themselves. They were graded on effort and effectiveness with the time they had to write their novel.
     “I am learning to always believe in yourself in whatever you do and even when things get difficult, try and do your best,” McWilliams said.
     About 65 students in two classes wrote a total of 233,392 words. Every student had to deal with their own struggles like writers block or feeling intimidated, but they worked hard and finished their novels.
     “I was impressed with how hard students worked and how much they encouraged each other,” Bartholomew said. “I heard students giving pep talks, sharing their stories, and giving feedback and ideas to each other.”

About the Writer
Rylee Anforth, Chronicle Editor, Announcements Host and Editor
My name is Rylee. I like to eat food, it’s pretty fun. I like horses and dogs, they’re also pretty fun.
2 Comments

2 Responses to “NaNoWriMo helps students overcome challenges”

  1. Marion Blakely on January 9th, 2018 9:33 am

    I really liked the article great job!

    [Reply]

  2. Morgan Wright on January 9th, 2018 9:42 am

    This is a great story and you did amazing

    [Reply]

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




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NaNoWriMo helps students overcome challenges